' Current Exhibitions - Kim Foster Gallery
Current Exhibition
Icarus-Colour-Space: Sydney Blum
October 20 - December 17, 2016

“Icarus-Colour-Space” new work by artist Sydney Blum is shaped like a wing, suggesting a continuum of time and space. The ways in which the grids, colors and shapes are composed make you feel as if you are about to take off. This is where the title of the exhibition comes in. Icarus is, of course, the figure in Greek myth whose father fashioned wings of feathers and wax so that they could escape imprisonment on an island. Icarus, young and full of life, skateboarded through the sky, as it were. Yet in spite of his father’s warnings, he flew too near the sun, the wax on his wings melted, and he fell to his death.

Sydney Blum has used the idea of Icarus flying towards the sun as the impetus of her new work. Here, she attempts to describe and create the motion and sensation of flying but in solid form: an incongruity that is not lost on her. She juxtaposes and distorts colors and lines and shapes in such ways as to produce seemingly contradictory vibrating waves of energy in our consciousness. We see the form, the suggestion of a wing, a shield, an expanding and contracting grid underlaid with gradations of color. The flight that draws us through this complex undulating interplay of color, shapes, shadows and light takes us somewhere else. Towards the sun, perhaps. Into the unknown, certainly.

Gravitational Waves: Margaret Evangeline
October 20 - December 17, 2016

“Gravitational Waves” was in part inspired by the announcement of the proof of Einstein’s 70-year-old prediction of the existence of gravitational waves. The artist recently had a dinner conversation at KentPresents with the renowned physicist Kip Thorne whose research led to the proof of Einstein’s theory, capturing the sound of two black holes colliding at the birth of our universe some 1.3 billion light years away.

Evangeline wrote “ …I was compelled by the sound of the fleeting chirp of the collision of two black holes in part because my work processes personal and familial mythologies. This event was heard and recorded in Livingston Parish, Louisiana near my birth place. I never suspected that research of this import was happening there. ” The Louisiana event propelled her to act. Years before she learned from a fellow resident at Santa Fe Art Institute to follow the faintest traces of what you cannot understand because somewhere on Earth there will be someone doing work that provides the support for yours. “I just didn’t expect it to come from the field of science…”

Seeing a conceptualized illustration of energy inside a black hole struck her as the drawings she made of camellias from her mother’s garden. Evangeline claims that her mother’s camellias felt important and that she knew that they would inspire something some day when she was ready. The artist believes that we are built to understand the world through patterns of accidents and coincidences.

Upcoming Exhibition
Susan Wides: this—seasons
January 05 - February 25, 2017